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New system developed that can switch on immune cells to attack cancer cells

Researchers have developed an artificial structure that mimics the cell membrane, which can switch on immune cells to attack and destroy a designated target.  This method has potential to be used as a future cancer immunotherapy treatment as well as providing more insight into how immune cells are activated to find and kill cancer cells. The findings are presented today (07/12/2016) at the Joint Congress of the British and Dutch Societies for Immunology, taking place in Liverpool, UK.

Reason why farm kids develop fewer allergies explained

Scientists have discovered why growing up on a farm might protect children from developing allergies. Using studies in both mice and humans, they found that exposure to farm dust increases expression of a protective protein that suppresses the inflammatory immune system by modifying the communication between the lining of the lungs and the immune system. The findings are presented today (07/12/16) at the Joint Congress of the British and Dutch Societies for Immunology, taking place in Liverpool, UK.

Using mass cytometry to identify clinically relevant biological signatures in human health and disease

In this virtual seminar from our Corporate Member, Fluidigm, Dr Brice Gaudilliere (Stanford School of Medicine) will discuss how his group applies mass cytometry and other proteomic technologies to obtain multi-omic views of clinical scenarios including surgery recovery, pregnancy and immune dysfunction.

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